Boya BY-V01 stereo on camera microphone

Today, I’m looking at the microphone is the BOYA BY-V01 Stereo X/Y Mini Condenser Microphone.

This cheap stereo microphone is available on eBay and other locations, for about $30 Australian. I bought it wanting something cheap and low profile to sit on my camera most of the time, so I can get better sounding audio when I’m shooting, and I don’t want the bulk and clutter of the Rode Videomic.

From the outside, it looks OK. It’s a nice size, doesn’t stick out too far, and seems reasonably built.

The mic in place on my Canon 650d

The mic in place on my Canon 650d

But fairly quickly, you’ll establish that while it does work, it does have some fairly hard to ignore issues. I was hoping, being an externally powered microphone, it would a reasonable level of gain on the output of the mic, but it appears that there isn’t a whole lot of additional amplification given to the recording level.

This isn’t ideal for most DSLR cameras with microphone inputs. They are often build with budget preamps if they are luck enough to have mic inputs at all. The high noise recordings aren’t the greatest. Usually, the best thing to do is to have a microphone that has a strong output, or run an external mixer or preamp so you can turn down the inputs on the camera.

But that’s not the big issue on this microphone.

The sound recorded to camera appears to be flipped from what you would expect, With the left channel coming from the right, and vice-versa. That is a fixable issue by either flipping the channels in post, or re wiring the mic, but the point is, you shouldn’t have to do either. Also, to make matters worse, even if you do fix it, the sound image is not properly centered. If a sound is coming directly to the front of the mic, it will appear to come from one side of the mic.

I suspect the source of this problem comes from the fact that this microphone is not actually an X/Y microphone like advertised. If you pull the mic apart (like I did), It is actually appears to be a mid/side microphone.

Being  a mid/side microphone isn’t an issue (apart from the misleading labelling), I am guessing the side capsule is not performing as an accurate figure 8 microphone, and it is biasing one side just a little bit.


Boya microphone array internals

Boya microphone internals

 

My verdict on this microphone is that its probably not worth the $30. I wouldn’t buy it again. If you have a camera with on board microphones (like most, if not all you’d consider mounting this to), You will likely get audio that is as good as, if not better than this microphone. Sure, there might be some purposes that see it being useful, like using it with the little deadcat in windy environments, that would probably yield slightly better results than the internal mic. The sound quality isn’t great, I’d say close to the on camera ones on the 650D, and it has issues with the stereo reproduction. I’d think twice about buying this mic. Save your money. for a little more you can get something a little better from a name brand like Rode, or Tascam. You’ll get much better results there.

Cam Caddie Flashner Kit

I joined the Planet 5D forum, as during the month of July, they were having a competition, giving away a camera, and some other bits and pieces. Yes, I know its now October. This post has been on my to do list for a while.

I was lucky enough to win a Cam Caddie Flashner Kit.

Camcaddie Flashner

I wasn’t really expecting to win, but I thought I would give it a shot.

I would like to thank Mitch from the Planet 5D forums for hosting the competition. Hopefully You’ve gotten a bunch of new, and valuable members of the forum. I’ll certainly be hanging about.

And thanks to Cam Caddie for offering the wonderful prize.

DIY Camera Slider

Here is the complete slider. I originally had a different head on it, but this one is much more flexible than the first.

Here is the complete slider. I originally had a different head on it, but this one is much more flexible than the first.

Video sliders are handy little things. I probably first became aware of them on Philip Bloom’s blog (which is great, if you’re into video production). They are quite effective at adding some interesting movement, and dramatic effect to shots that my otherwise be fairly static. This last week I attempted to make myself a mini camera dolly / slider with bits and pieces I had kicking around.

I began with the rails. They are made from 2 pieces of Aluminium extruded angle, maybe 2cm square. The length length was whatever they were already ( i guess about 50 – 60cm). They are screwed down to two pieces of wood, one on each end. The rails are basically done at this point. I thought it would be handy to put some sticky rubber feet on the bottom to help hold the slider in position. (The feet didn’t work the greatest, but they are better than nothing)

The ends are terribly complex things to make. A chunk of wood, and some screws, and you're done.

The ends are terribly complex things to make. A chunk of wood, and some screws, and you’re done.

The tricky part was always going to be the sliding platform. Most pro ones use bearing to roll smoothly, and effortlessly across the track. I don’t really have any bearings suitable, and while I did contemplate buying some for the task, I decided simple is best. Digging through my piles of bits and pieces, I came across some small nylon sticks. I have no idea what they are from, but they were the right size, and right price. I drilled two holes through all 8 of them in pairs (a top, and bottom piece for 4 corners), so the holes would line up properly. Then I grabbed a piece of aluminium plate which I had kicking around, and marked out holes that would match the holes drilled in the sliders. I managed to get the holes pretty spot on, and the small bolts I used just dropped right through. I tightened the bolts up until everything was held in place, but there was still enough movement of everything to slide.  At this point, I drilled a hole through the center of the aluminium base, and bolted on the tripod head (which was later swapped out for the ball head, which is pictured, and is mounted in a different spot)

Here is a close up of th sliding platform, giving a general view of how its constructed

Here is a close up of th sliding platform, giving a general view of how its constructed

Here you can see the bottom nylon sliders

Here you can see the bottom nylon sliders

The grand total of this build was $0 for me, but if you have to buy parts, obviously it will cost you more.

Below you can see a very boring, and short demo video I made last night with the slider. Not at all interesting, and as I just chucked the camera on, lighting and colour balance isn’t the greatest, so forgive me.

Is it any good?

So, do I call this project a success? well, it works, kind of. It might be fun to play with round the house, but I’m not sure I’d want to take it out in public. It certainly has its issues, and I suspect, at the very least, will need a few revisions.

There is slack in the sliding platform which lets it slop around a bit too much. I can avoid some of this by tightening the nylon sliders, but that creates too much friction and then the slider doesn’t slide very well. I am contemplating fashioning a different one, made from one or two large pieces of nylon cutting board which are grooved to fit the rails in exactly.

Also, the small bolts that I’ve used have a tendency of coming loose. The addition of a lock nut on each would probably fix. I just need to find some.

General stability is lacking, and with the DSLR mounted, its impossible to let go of  it without it falling over sideways, and smacking the camera lens into the ground, which we all can agree that that is a bad idea. The slider could definitely do with some wider legs, and I’ll be looking into that shortly too.

My wife is so wonderfu!

It’s my birthday today, and my awesome wife Diana bought me some awesome presents.

First off was the Cigweld Weldskill 170. That’s the one I knew about. It was already awesome!

What I wasn’t expecting is the iPod
Touch I was presented with when I woke up this morning! OMFGZ I wasn’t expecting that!

So here I am, writing a blog post on the touch, just to test it out!

Yeah!

I love you sweetie! You blow my mind every birthday!
Xoxox

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In-phone video production on a Nokia 5800

A couple of months ago now, I finally ditched prepaid phones again, and got myself a plan, and along with the plan came a new phone.

The phone is Nokia 5800 XpressMusic.

I discovered that with the phone, it is possible to film, perform basic editing, add titles, and background music, and then upload it to YouTube, all from the phone itself

The above video, staring my lovely fiancée Diana, was created from start to finish in camera

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Camcorder Microphone Adapter

This is my latest project. It is a converter box that converts the 3.5mm stereo microphone input on my camcorder, into some common interfaces, Such as XLR, RCA, and dual 3.5 mono plugs.

Specifically, the driving idea was driven by the XLR inputs, and I was contemplating making a simple cable with 2 XLRs, but I decided to go with the jiffy box and extra inputs for flexiblilty

 drawing of the converter

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Scientists Colour by Number

Crayon rendition of the Mars Landscape

Crayon rendition of the Mars Landscape

While sifting thru the 200 or so blog posts in my rss reader, I came across this interesting little article on Gismodo about the first pictures from the surface of Mars in 1965

“people at the JPL were so excited to receive the images that they couldn’t wait for them to be processed by the lab’s imager. As the first picture was beamed down as a stream of 8-bit numbers—each point indicating a brightness point—they thought of a quick way to get an image straight away: Print the numbers indicating brightness in paper strips, put them together, and colour them with pastel crayons.”

Its a amazing that crayons needed to be used to get a “fast” graphical representation, contrasted by today’s real time processing. We are however, talking about a time when computers where huge room filling machines, with processing speeds a fraction of what can be found in most peoples pockets these days.

Now, I keep coming back to data visualisation, but that is mostly due to visualisation being the topic of choice for the assignment. I have the assignment partially underway at the time being, with my idea fairly solid in my head, and starting to form in real life

All this talk of crayons got my want to do my assignment in old school kindergarten style, and so this is my assignment:

My bank balance over 2 weeks

My bank balance over 2 weeks

LOL, just kidding. it is a rough approximation of my bank account over the last 2 weeks. really, it should be shown with my other bank accounts for an accurate picture, as the spikes in the middle are due to me transferring money from them to this one, not some extra covert payments or anything.

Am I crazy for going to the shops and spending $3.60 for a pack of pencils to do this? quite possibly, yes. for some reason I envisioned something more impressive, but alas, here we are.

Right now, I’m looking for a convenient way of converting images to a numbered grid to make my own mars style crayon pictures. I’m also interested in checking out a few different things, like rendering items in Lego bricks and the likes.

Anyway, that’s enough crazy for the time being, to I’ll leave you to it.

Matt